Due to Continuous Supply Issues We Have Suspended The Service Until October

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Due to Continuous Supply Issues We Have Suspended The Service Until October

Please register your interest by filling out this form

  • This field is for validation purposes and should be left unchanged.

Flu Jab 2020 - 2021 Service

Protect yourself and others by getting the flu jab this season at Spatetree Pharmacy

We are taking provisional bookings ahead of the service going live in Spetember 2020

Flu Jab 2020 - 2021 Service

Protect yourself and others by getting the flu jab this season at Spatetree Pharmacy

We are taking provisional bookings ahead of the service going live in Spetember 2020

Here are some common questions on flu

You’re eligible for a FREE NHS flu vaccine if:
  • You’re over 65
  • You’re pregnant
  • You have asthma or a lung condition
  • You have chronic heart disease
  • You have diabetes
  • You have a chronic kidney or liver condition
  • You’ve had a stroke
  • You have an illness or are taking medicines that affect your immune system
  • You are a household contacts of those on the NHS Shielded Patient List
This list is constantly reviewed by the NHS. You can find the latest updates on the NHS Website.

It is FREE if you qualify for the NHS services otherwise it is £13.99. This is payable on the day the jab is administered.

Flu is a common infectious viral illness spread by coughs and sneezes. It can be very unpleasant, but you’ll usually begin to feel better within about a week.

However, it can lead to serious complications if you have a long-term health condition and it can be horrible for little children. If children catch flu they can quickly spread it around the whole family.

The best way to protect yourself and your family is to get the flu jab.

Also, flu vaccination is one of the most effective interventions we have to reduce pressure on the health and social care system this winter. We are currently seeing the impact ofCOVID-19 on the NHS and social care, and this coming winter we may be faced with co-circulation of COVID-19 and flu.

The flu vaccination programme runs between September 2020 and March 2021. However it is importantthat you get vaccinated early in the season for multiple reasons.

Primarily because you would be protected very early, and also because the supply of vaccines is very limited.

It is impossible to get the flu from the flu vaccine. The vaccine doesn’t contain live flu viruses and therefore cannot result in a case of the flu. However, sometimes people catch a cold shortly after having the vaccine and this can make you feel ill. It’s important to remember that this is not the flu, it is a cold that mimics some symptoms of the flu but is far less acute or deadly.

After the flu vaccination, you may get a mild fever and slight muscle aches for a day or so. But most people don’t have these side-effects. Some people may have a sore arm after vaccination – but again, not everyone.

About 0.2 to 0.3 per cent of the general population have an allergy to eggs. Eggs are used in producing the vaccine.

If an egg-free flu vaccine is not available, a GP may be able to find a suitable flu vaccine with a low egg content. But if you or your child are allergic to eggs, speak to your GP.

 

The flu virus changes and mutates each year. So getting vaccinated each year is important to make sure you have immunity to the strains most likely to cause an outbreak.  The flu vaccine won’t protect against all strains of the virus, but it will make sure it gives you immunity against the strains most likely to cause an outbreak.

Yes, the vaccine can save your life, that of your loved ones and, if you’re pregnant, the life of your unborn child.  By getting the vaccine, you’re also preventing spreading the virus to other people.

The NHS Flu Vaccination web page has a wealth of information that is very useful.